Friday 11th December 1914

It was a fine day. There was a Christmas Tree in the Claim Hall this evening, but none of us went.

Went down to meet the Steamer in the evening to get the , she did not arrive here until 9pm so as I had to wait Wil Dunnings & I went into Archie Dunnings and played 500. Ken Wallace sent me this mornings Herald containing the returns of yesterday’s Election.

While I was down there I heard that Mr G. Knaggs had died at 4pm this afternoon.

 

Thursday 10th December 1914

It was a fine day. Polling Day throughout New Zealand for Member of the House of Representatives. In the afternoon I went to see Mr G. Knaggs who is very ill, I made his will and Mrs Rogers & I were the Witnesses. I had tea there, returned home and then went down to the Hall to record my vote, I walked down to get the mail & attend the Library, staid down till 10.30 to hear the returns as they came in. It came on a misty rain and dark. I got wet coming home and had a difficulty in finding my way.

 

Wednesday 9th December 1914

It was a fine day. Willie got up very early and hauled the 12 Cases of Plums & two boxes of butter & eggs down to the wharf. In the morning I got firewood, the remainder of the day I took it easy as I was not very well.

 

Tuesday 8th December 1914

After breakfast I went down to the village to help Revd Macdonald measure off the Church site. After I returned home I commenced picking Evans Early plums, Mrs Simpson and Grace were helping in the afternoon and after tea Willie came out and was helping, we picked 12 Cases. I was very bad with a cold on my chest in the evening and went to bed early. Willie put hot flannels on my chest which gave me great relief.

 

Monday 7th December 1914

It was a fine day. In the morning I got firewood. In the afternoon Revd Macdonald & his Aunt Mrs Henry called, he had a look round the garden and he sought my advice about ordering some Roses. Afterwards I went down when the Steamer arrived and got the mail, after which I went up to Joe Wyatts and Alex Haskell and I witnessed his Will.

 

Sunday 6th December 1914

It was a fine day, Jane & the children went home in the morning in Charlie Dunnings cream cart.

Revd Macdonald conducted service in the Hall in the afternoon. Mr Handby was here for dinner and went with us to Church.

 

Saturday 5th December 1914

It was a fine day. As we did not get home from the Ball until 3am we did not get up very early, and it was an idle day. Went to Joe Wyatts in the afternoon. Jane & the children, who were over for the Ball, came up here in the afternoon to stay the night.

 

Friday 4th December 1914

It was a fine day. In the morning I went over to the farm orchard, cut some pea sticks to stick the last row of peas I planted.

Joe Wyatt was here to get my signature.  In the evening the Bachelors gave a grand plain & fancy dress ball in this Hall, all of us went and enjoyed ourselves very much, there were a lot of fancy dresses. Musicians came from Auckland a pianist, a violinist and a cornet player, there was some good singing and abundance of refreshments. I was playing 500.

 

Thursday 3rd December 1914

It was a fine day. In the morning I was working in the flower garden, cutting off the spent rose blooms and tidying up.

In the afternoon I went to see Mr G Knaggs who is confined to his bed and in a very weak condition. In the evening I went down for the mail and attended the Library.

 

Wednesday 2nd December 1914

It was a fine day. Bid good bye to the Wallaces who had been very kind to me and where I had spent a very happy time, went across to Auckland by the 9am boat. Collected up my parcels and embarked on board the “Kawau” which left Auckland at 11am, there were a lot of Omaha people returning home after the Show, although the steamer was rolling a bit I did not feel at all sick, went down to have dinner and was playing 500 in the afternoon. Willie did not meet me as he is working in the quarry for Dunning & Wyatt. John Greenwood took me and my parcels up to our gate. I was glad to get home. Everything in the garden seemed to be very dry.